Culture & Community

Hope-Giving Breakthroughs from the Weizmann Institute in 2018

E-news, January 2019 • TAGS: Community, Leadership, Culture

As we take a moment to reflect on 2018, one thing is clear: the world needs science now more than ever. The past year was a time of flux, which makes us all the more grateful for Weizmann’s unchanging mission of “science for the benefit of humanity.” Scientific progress holds the promise of a better world – and here are just some of the breakthroughs from 2018 that inspire hope:

  • Prof. Ruth Arnon, renowned co-developer of Copaxone®, one of the world’s leading multiple sclerosis drugs, has developed a universal flu vaccine. The vaccine, which entered Phase III clinical trials in 2018, could protect people against all strains of the virus, for many years, in a single shot.

  • The personalized nutrition research of Profs. Eran Elinav and Eran Segal continues to produce surprising, and helpful, results. For example, they discovered that, contrary to popular opinion, probiotics are not only not beneficial, but can even be harmful, particularly when taken after a course of antibiotics.

  • Prof. Yardena Samuels studies melanoma, the deadliest of all skin cancers. Using the powerful new tools of immunotherapy, she developed a novel, highly personalized approach to identifying “signposts” on cancer cells that can help immune cells target – and eliminate – melanoma.

  • The quantum computers of the future will function at a volume and speed that today’s electronic computers can only dream about. Now, by developing the “quantum gates” required for communication within and between quantum computers, Prof. Barak Dayan may have brought us a step closer to tomorrow. He believes that the gates will become an essential building block for quantum computers.

  • Prof. Ron Milo examines the impact of humans upon the planet. Just one of his headline-making studies from 2018 revealed that hundreds of millions more people – more than the entire population of America, in fact – could eat if we switched to plant-based diets. Such a choice would also benefit the environment and enhance food security. In a time when we are witnessing a famine of historic proportions, his work has particular relevance.

There were many other advances in 2018: the continued success of CAR-T cancer immunotherapy, developed by Prof. Zelig Eshhar; discoveries about autoimmune diseases; new information about the brain in health and disease – even the continued development of Israel’s first spacecraft. 

Each and every one of these breakthroughs was made possible by donors like you. Please help science continue to bring hope to the world, making life better for all of us, in 2019 and beyond.

Culture & Community

Hope-Giving Breakthroughs from the Weizmann Institute in 2018

E-news, January 2019 • TAGS: Community, Leadership, Culture

As we take a moment to reflect on 2018, one thing is clear: the world needs science now more than ever. The past year was a time of flux, which makes us all the more grateful for Weizmann’s unchanging mission of “science for the benefit of humanity.” Scientific progress holds the promise of a better world – and here are just some of the breakthroughs from 2018 that inspire hope:

  • Prof. Ruth Arnon, renowned co-developer of Copaxone®, one of the world’s leading multiple sclerosis drugs, has developed a universal flu vaccine. The vaccine, which entered Phase III clinical trials in 2018, could protect people against all strains of the virus, for many years, in a single shot.

  • The personalized nutrition research of Profs. Eran Elinav and Eran Segal continues to produce surprising, and helpful, results. For example, they discovered that, contrary to popular opinion, probiotics are not only not beneficial, but can even be harmful, particularly when taken after a course of antibiotics.

  • Prof. Yardena Samuels studies melanoma, the deadliest of all skin cancers. Using the powerful new tools of immunotherapy, she developed a novel, highly personalized approach to identifying “signposts” on cancer cells that can help immune cells target – and eliminate – melanoma.

  • The quantum computers of the future will function at a volume and speed that today’s electronic computers can only dream about. Now, by developing the “quantum gates” required for communication within and between quantum computers, Prof. Barak Dayan may have brought us a step closer to tomorrow. He believes that the gates will become an essential building block for quantum computers.

  • Prof. Ron Milo examines the impact of humans upon the planet. Just one of his headline-making studies from 2018 revealed that hundreds of millions more people – more than the entire population of America, in fact – could eat if we switched to plant-based diets. Such a choice would also benefit the environment and enhance food security. In a time when we are witnessing a famine of historic proportions, his work has particular relevance.

There were many other advances in 2018: the continued success of CAR-T cancer immunotherapy, developed by Prof. Zelig Eshhar; discoveries about autoimmune diseases; new information about the brain in health and disease – even the continued development of Israel’s first spacecraft. 

Each and every one of these breakthroughs was made possible by donors like you. Please help science continue to bring hope to the world, making life better for all of us, in 2019 and beyond.