May is Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month – the perfect time, as we head into summer, to think about protecting our skin. The American Cancer Society predicts that in 2019, almost 100,000 American adults will be diagnosed with invasive melanoma, and while that number may not be massive, it’s important, as melanoma is the deadliest of the skin cancers. Treatments are often ineffective; thus, early intervention is crucial.

That’s one reason we are glad to share with you the recent research of Prof. Yardena Samuels. Her previous melanoma research includes discovering a gene that helps the cancer survive. In the current breakthrough, she discovered “signposts” on cancer cells that immune cells can “read” and, thus, target the cancer. Her work could lead to what she calls an “ultra-personalized” therapy for melanoma. “This would be the ultimate personalized cancer therapy,” says Prof. Samuels, “a new drug is created for every patient.”

You can partner with Prof. Samuels and other Weizmann Institute scientists studying skin cancer, and help them to save our skins – literally. Please give.

 

Fighting Cancer

May is Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month

E-news, May 2019 • TAGS: Cancer, Cancer treatment, Immunotherapy

May is Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month – the perfect time, as we head into summer, to think about protecting our skin. The American Cancer Society predicts that in 2019, almost 100,000 American adults will be diagnosed with invasive melanoma, and while that number may not be massive, it’s important, as melanoma is the deadliest of the skin cancers. Treatments are often ineffective; thus, early intervention is crucial.

That’s one reason we are glad to share with you the recent research of Prof. Yardena Samuels. Her previous melanoma research includes discovering a gene that helps the cancer survive. In the current breakthrough, she discovered “signposts” on cancer cells that immune cells can “read” and, thus, target the cancer. Her work could lead to what she calls an “ultra-personalized” therapy for melanoma. “This would be the ultimate personalized cancer therapy,” says Prof. Samuels, “a new drug is created for every patient.”

You can partner with Prof. Samuels and other Weizmann Institute scientists studying skin cancer, and help them to save our skins – literally. Please give.