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Showing results 101-111 of 123 for 'Brain'


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    Immune System Maintains Brain Health

    Prof. Michal Schwartz's groundbreaking research on neuroimmunology changed the way scientists and clinicians view the interaction between the immune system and the brain. The Scientist provides in-depth reporting on what neuroimmunology is, how it works, and why it is so important.

    /news-media/other/immune-system-maintains-brain-health
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    Unfolding the Mysteries of Proteins

    WeizmannViews Issue No. 46 is about the research of new young scientist Dr. Rina Rosenzweig. She is expert in using super-powerful NMR machines, applying these skills to her studies of misfolded proteins and the clumps they form. These protein “aggregates” are involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s.

    /news-media/feature-stories/unfolding-the-mysteries-of-proteins
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    Lighting Up the Mechanisms of Brain Disease

    In Issue No. 47 of Weizmann Views, serendipity leads Dr. Ofer Yizhar to his life’s work: pioneering the remarkable new field of optogenetics. Optogenetics combines optics – the branch of physics concerned with light – and genetics to offer previously unimaginable new ways of studying the brain. Dr. Yizhar's work has particular import for the understanding of autism.

    /news-media/feature-stories/lighting-up-the-mechanisms-of-brain-disease
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    CEO Conference Call: Science at the Leading Edge

    On February 28, 2017, American Committee donors of all giving levels were invited to join a special conference call with CEO Marshall S. Levin. More than 100 donors from across the country participated. Mr. Levin spoke on the topic of “Science at the Leading Edge: Latest Breakthroughs from the Weizmann Institute of Science.” He opened with an overview of the Weizmann Institute and its reputation as a relatively small institution with “an outsized impact” on the world. He then discussed the Institute’s game-changing research on the aging brain, as well as the work of its Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine. Through these and other initiatives, the Institute seeks to improve the quality of life of every person on the planet.

    /news-media/feature-stories/ceo-conference-call-science-at-the-leading-edge
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    Turning Down the Brain to Erase Fearful Memories

    Dr. Ofer Yizhar, optogenetics pioneer, has used the tools of that field to successfully shut down a neuronal mechanism that helps form fearful memories in the mouse brain. After the procedure, the mice “forgot” that they had been previously frightened. This research, conducted with Prof. Rony Paz, may someday help extinguish traumatic memories in people.

    /news-media/news-releases/turning-down-the-brain-to-erase-fearful-memories
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    Shedding Light on the Secrets of Autism

    The Weizmann Institute’s diverse, creative autism research is exemplified by three recent projects: investigating the immune system-brain development connection, using optogenetics to turn autistic behaviors on and off, and determining the causes of social shyness.

    /news-media/feature-stories/shedding-light-on-the-secrets-of-autism
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    Could Erasing Traumatic Memories One Day Eradicate PTSD?

    Israel21c reports on research by optogenetics pioneer Dr. Ofer Yizhar. Working with Weizmann colleague Prof. Rony Paz and others, Dr. Yizhar showed that weakening the communication between two parts of the brain reduced fear levels in mice. “This new technique may one day help extinguish traumatic memories in humans – for example, in people with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.”

    /news-media/in-the-news/could-erasing-traumatic-memories-one-day-eradicate-ptsd
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    The Brain’s Rejuvenating Cells

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease manifested by various neuronal pathological processes and a significant decline in brain function. Aggregates of beta-amyloid protein (“plaques”) accumulate within and between brain cells. Due to both structural changes and the weakening of chemical communication pathways, the junctions of neuronal networks (synapses) are lost. In addition, the cytoskeletal proteins of the axons lose their normal structure, impairing their function and causing massive neuronal death.

    /news-media/news-releases/the-brains-rejuvenating-cells
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    World Alzheimer’s Month: How is Weizmann Helping?

    September is World Alzheimer’s Month – a fact that highlights the disease’s unfortunate status as a major, ongoing, global health crisis. There are many intersecting reasons that Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise; ironically, most of them are also advances, such as better healthcare, prevention, nutrition, safety, and the like, all of which lead to increased longevity. And while Alzheimer’s is a disease of the aging brain, there is also a significant genetic component to this devastating illness. As of now, despite many years and many billions of dollars, there is no truly effective treatment, much less a cure.

    /news-media/feature-stories/world-alzheimer-s-month-how-is-weizmann-helping