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Showing results 21-31 of 61 for 'Chemistry'


  • supernova-galaxy-ugc-tn
    Blowing in the (Stellar) Wind

    It is theorized that massive stars have lighter elements on the outside, heavier ones at the core, and that there must be a layer where these meet – and where, possibly, nitrogen is formed. Taking measurements just 15 hours after a star exploded in a supernova, astrophysicists found nitrogen – and shed new light on the origins of the universe.

    /news-media/news-releases/blowing-in-the-stellar-wind
  • Nobel_medal-tn
    Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2013

    In the 1960s, Arieh Warshel and Michael Levitt were scientists at the Institute when they developed a computer program to model large biological molecules. Now, along with colleague Martin Karplus, they have received the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry ""for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.""

    /news-media/news-releases/nobel-prize-in-chemistry-2013
  • radiocarbon-dating-skeletons-a-b-thumb
    Oldest Use of Flowers in Grave Lining

    When we think of our prehistoric ancestors, we don't usually imagine them lining graves with flowers. Yet they did – and Dr. Elisabetta Boaretto has now identified the oldest such grave. Head of Weizmann's new Dangoor – Research Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (D-REAMS) lab, she will use this powerful technology to solve archaeology's mysteries.

    /news-media/news-releases/oldest-use-of-flowers-in-grave-lining
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  • corrosion-tn
    Super-Slick Material Makes Steel Better, Stronger, Cleaner

    Harvard reports the creation of the ""most durable anti-fouling material to date,"" which protects and improves steel. Dr. Alexander Tesler, a former postdoc at Harvard and now a research fellow in the Weizmann Institute's Department of Materials and Interfaces, led the research into a way to make steel safer and less susceptible to corrosion.

    /news-media/in-the-news/super-slick-material-makes-steel-better-stronger-cleaner
  • handshake-tn
    Are You a Handshake Sniffer?

    Rita J. King, Co-Director of Science House and Weizmann Advocate for Curiosity, writes about ""the incredible"" Prof. Noam Sobel's findings that people tend to sniff their hands – subconsciously, of course – after shaking someone else's hand. Perhaps counterintuitively, we actually sniff longer after shaking the hand of someone of the same gender.

    /news-media/in-the-news/are-you-a-handshake-sniffer