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Showing results 1-11 of 79 for 'Immune system'


  • alon_t-cell-makes-holes_01_17_6678ad08-5aa2-4d99-a3ab-c2671fda718f
    White Blood Cells Get Pushy to Reach Infection

    How do white blood cells - the immune cells that race to the sites of infection and inflammation - actually get to their targets? The research of Prof. Ronen Alon has revealed that the white blood cells actually force their way through the blood vessel walls to reach the infection, creating large holes. This understanding could aid in cancer research.

    /news-media/news-releases/white-blood-cells-get-pushy-to-reach-infection
  • fleishman-sarel_1 (1)
    Matching Proteins, Defeating Disease

    Dr. Sarel Fleishman studies how proteins ""mate,"" or fit together – and, in fact, created his own method that lets scientists change the surface of proteins so that they mate with other proteins of the researcher's choice. This technique could lead to new treatments aimed at viruses, bacteria, and cancer.

    /news-media/feature-stories/matching-proteins-defeating-disease
  • 2014-9-acwis-enews-header-thumbnail
    Artificial Sweeteners Hit a Sour Note

    Artificial sweeteners have long been promoted as diet and health aids – but Weizmann scientists have discovered that such products may be causing our gut bacteria to trigger harmful metabolic changes. In other words, the sweeteners may be leading to the very diseases – such as obesity – they were supposed to help prevent.

    /news-media/feature-stories/artificial-sweeteners-hit-a-sour-note
  • gut-bacteria-reaction-cartoon-tn
    Gut Bacteria, Artificial Sweeteners, and Glucose Intolerance

    Artificial sweeteners have long been promoted as diet and health aids. But breaking research shows that these products may be leading to the very diseases they were said to help prevent: Dr. Eran Elinav and Prof. Eran Segal have discovered that, after exposure to artificial sweeteners, our gut bacteria may be triggering harmful metabolic changes.

    /news-media/news-releases/gut-bacteria-artificial-sweeteners-and-glucose-intolerance
  • Science Tips, December 2011

    Three updates from the Weizmann Institute: performing secure cloud computing; evidence that endothelial cells may actively direct immune cells; and a possible new scenario for supernova development.

    /news-media/feature-stories/science-tips-december-2011
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  • yair-reisner-tn
    A Pioneer in the Stem Cell Frontier

    Prof. Yair Reisner is expert at tricking the immune system into accepting trans¬plants it would normally reject. He made a lifesaving breakthrough that lets immunocompromised patients receive bone marrow from a mismatched donor, then expanded the method to leukemia patients – and as if that's not enough, he's now applying it to organ transplants.

    /news-media/feature-stories/a-pioneer-in-the-stem-cell-frontier
  • Battling Glaucoma

    To aid glaucoma sufferers, Prof. Michal Schwartz developed a way of boosting the body's ""beneficial"" autoimmune response by using the drug Copaxone to protect the optic nerve from neuronal degeneration.

    /news-media/feature-stories/battling-glaucoma
  • arabidopsis-tn
    Science Tips, October 2015

    Three updates from the labs of the Weizmann Institute: discovery of a tumor suppressor gene behind a deadly form of melanoma; finding that lack of a certain protein leads to obesity, no matter the diet; and learning why plants ""drive"" with one foot on the brake rather than operate at full efficiency.

    /news-media/news-releases/science-tips-october-2015
  • New Hope for Kidney Patients

    With a new achievement—growing tiny, functional kidneys in mice out of human stem cells—Prof. Yair Reisner is progressing toward making transplants immediately and widely available to those who need them. 

    /news-media/feature-stories/new-hope-for-kidney-patients