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Showing results 31-35 of 35 for 'Mental health'


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    Keeping Up the Pressure

    The lab of Prof. Alon Chen has found that, besides our classic stress response – an acute reaction that gradually abates when the threat passes – we appear to have a separate mechanism that deals only with chronic stress. The team found a new mechanism that apparently regulates the stress response. These findings may lead to better diagnosis of and treatment for anxiety and depression.

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    Understanding the Anxious Brain

    In Issue No. 44 of WeizmannViews, we share the stress-response-related research of Prof. Rony Paz. He investigates how the brain processes stress - for example, how is a traumatic event encoded in such a way as to trigger PTSD? His work could lead to new and better treatments for mental illnesses.

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    Shedding Light on the Secrets of Autism

    The Weizmann Institute’s diverse, creative autism research is exemplified by three recent projects: investigating the immune system-brain development connection, using optogenetics to turn autistic behaviors on and off, and determining the causes of social shyness.

    /news-media/feature-stories/shedding-light-on-the-secrets-of-autism
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    Could Erasing Traumatic Memories One Day Eradicate PTSD?

    Israel21c reports on research by optogenetics pioneer Dr. Ofer Yizhar. Working with Weizmann colleague Prof. Rony Paz and others, Dr. Yizhar showed that weakening the communication between two parts of the brain reduced fear levels in mice. “This new technique may one day help extinguish traumatic memories in humans – for example, in people with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.”

    /news-media/in-the-news/could-erasing-traumatic-memories-one-day-eradicate-ptsd
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    Stressed Out from Birth: Mice Exposed to Prenatal Stress Are Predisposed to Eating Disorders Later in Life

    Stress affects the body and can trigger illness – from psychiatric disorders to heart disease. Humans are exposed to stress at different intensities throughout life: as children, in adolescence, and in old age. But when is the impact of stress on our systems most powerful? Many researchers maintain that the critical effect occurs prenatally, inside the womb. This hypothesis was, until recently, based mainly on statistical data indicating a correlation between stress during pregnancy and susceptibility to disease.

    /news-media/news-releases/stressed-out-from-birth-mice-exposed-to-prenatal-stress-are-predisposed-to-eating-disorders-later-in-life