Search Results

Showing results 71-77 of 77 for 'Senses'


  • sky-diver-jump[1].jpg
    Autism Affects Ability to Smell Fear, Finds Skydiver Sweat Study

    The lack of ability to “smell fear” may reveal clues about behaviour and brain development in people with autism, according to a new study. We may not be aware of it, but research suggests many people are able to smell fear. In fact, the ability to subliminally detect and respond to odours may relate to a variety of emotions we feel, ranging from happiness to aggression. But in a new study published in Nature Neuroscience, Professor Noam Sobel and collaborators at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggest this ability might be disrupted in people with autism. People with autism often have difficulty processing sensory information.

    /news-media/in-the-news/autism-affects-ability-to-smell-fear-finds-skydiver-sweat-study
  • nachum-ulanovsky-tn.jpg
    Mapping the Social Landscape

    Whether we’re playing a team sport or just strolling through the park, we’re continually aware of the positions of those around us – and where each is heading. Scientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called “place cells” in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others has been a mystery. Published in Science, new Weizmann Institute of Science research in bats reveals a sub-population of neurons that encode the specific locations of other bats that are flying nearby.

    /news-media/news-releases/mapping-the-social-landscape
  • Social Place Cells - Weizmann Institute of Science.jpg
  • 2018-02-ACWIS-November-Enews-Header-final.jpg
  • jesse-orrico-60373.jpg
  • 415387.jpg
  • ulanovsky-1.jpg
    100 Bats and a Long, Dark Tunnel: One Neuroscientist’s Quest to Unlock the Secrets of 3D Navigation

    On a sun-parched patch of land in Rehovot, Israel, two neuroscientists peer into the darkness of a 200-metre-long tunnel of their own design. The fabric panels of the snaking structure shimmer in the heat, while, inside, a study subject is navigating its dim length. Finally, out of the blackness bursts a bat, which executes a mid-air backflip to land upside down, hanging at the tunnel’s entrance.

    /news-media/in-the-news/100-bats-and-a-long-dark-tunnel-one-neuroscientist-s-quest-to-unlock-the-secrets-of-3d-navigation