Prof. Maya Schuldiner of Weizmann’s Department of Molecular Genetics uses analogies to clarify the nature of cells. These tiny living beings are highly organized communities, and while there are different types – blood, skin, etc. – they have basically the same elements. One of these is the peroxisome, an organelle whose malfunction or absence can lead to devastating diseases in children.

Because cells are so similar, Prof. Schuldiner’s lab is able to use common Baker’s yeast as a stand in for the human cell to study peroxisomes. She hopes to someday offer treatment – even a cure – for the unique children suffering from peroxisomal diseases.

We also visit her lab – one of the first to use high-throughput robotics to speed up research.

Improving Health & Medicine

WIS TALKS: Prof. Maya Schuldiner – Beauty and the Yeast: A Protein Fairytale

• TAGS: Community , Biology , Molecular genetics , Children

 

Prof. Maya Schuldiner of Weizmann’s Department of Molecular Genetics uses analogies to clarify the nature of cells. These tiny living beings are highly organized communities, and while there are different types – blood, skin, etc. – they have basically the same elements. One of these is the peroxisome, an organelle whose malfunction or absence can lead to devastating diseases in children.

Because cells are so similar, Prof. Schuldiner’s lab is able to use common Baker’s yeast as a stand in for the human cell to study peroxisomes. She hopes to someday offer treatment – even a cure – for the unique children suffering from peroxisomal diseases.

We also visit her lab – one of the first to use high-throughput robotics to speed up research.